?

Log in

13 October 2013 @ 11:52 am
A whole year has almost passed since my update but here is the final episode review of Watchmen. I have a 20-minute wrap-up episode to follow which will include the highlights of the graphic novel and some other miscellaneous discussions pertaining to my podcast. I'll also be reviewing Zack Snyder's 2009 film adaptation and then I will start on a new podcast which will talk about the Before Watchmen comics. Thank you so much for everyone who tuned in and listened to every episode release despite the irregularities of my updates. It has been a tremendous pleasure and honor to be a part of the Watchdom! May Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' legacy live on!

CONTENT:
01 Introduction
02 The Story So Far
03 Visual Examination
04 Plot Pacing and Development
05 Characterization
06 Dialogue
07 Quote Reference

SONGS USED:
"Donna's Theme" for intro and story so far
"Martha's Theme" for visuals
"The Girl With No Name" for plot
"Amy's Theme" for characters
"A Secret He Will Take to His Grave" for dialogue and quote
"Frank Sinatra" by Cake for breaks
 
 
Current Mood: accomplished
 
 
I AM BACK AFTER FIVE MONTHS! It's officially the anniversary of this podcast. I hope this episode is worth the wait.

CONTENT:
01 Introduction
02 Visual Examination
03 Plot Pacing and Development
04 Characterization
05 Dialogue
06 Quote Reference
07 Closing

SONGS USED:
"Reckless" for intro and Q&A
"Man Who Sold the World" for music while reviewing
"Butterflies" by Belasco between breaks and closing



click me and listen to it here!

 
 
Current Mood: dorky
 
 
Deepest of apologies for the very long absence again after my hiatus. I cannot update that much on a bi-weekly basis but please enjoy this latest episode!

CONTENT:
01 Introduction
02 Visual Examination
03 Plot Pacing and Development
04 Characterization
05 Dialogue
06 Quote Reference
07 Closing

SONGS USED:
"Black of Hair" for intro
"You Win or You Die" for music while reviewing
"All Along the Watchtower" by Bob Dylan between breaks

*audio clip courtesy of Watchmen Motion Comics



click me and listen to it here!




  • The chapter runs 33:57 including instrumental tracks. Introduction is another pep talk. I announce updates about my college life. I will no longer make promises on when my next episode will be posted because my schedule is an asshole and sometimes free time is just not my best friend.

  • A special treat for the Visual Examination. Gibbons is masterful again with his exceptional art metaphors which I discussed in length. The imagery for this chapter is fascinating. I don't understand how Moore and Gibbons see the world in this way and I am envious that they do--yet honored that they share this gift with the rest of us mere readers.

  • Plot Pacing and Development is brief because I usually give myself and the listeners earaches by this segment. I don't want this to be another mouthful so I am abstaining from making this segment long. But with Watchmen, it's a real challenge.

  • Some delicious amount of bromance in Characterization. Rorschach and Nite Owl are adorable! ♥ I am so interested in their partnership and history. I also appreciate more Veidt face-time. The dude is crazy handsome in purple and gold. And a cat lover at that.

  • The Dialogue aspect is strangely beguiling. A lot of deduction exchanges between Nite Owl and Rorschach. Also, the memorable line "Egyptian decor is coloring logic" appears in this chapter :p

  • Quote Reference is finally another song lyric. An excellent way to tie-up everything.

  • Bob Dylan serenading my ears. The song is just as layered as his other songs.

The chapter feels like an opening to a can of worms. The climactic angle is exciting and the stories are neatly bundled together as Gibbons and Moore continue to reinforce their signature multi-layered art and prose on them. This was a wickedly enjoyable chapter.
 
 
Current Mood: bouncybouncy
 
 
29 March 2012 @ 07:23 pm
Finally! I'm back. I apologize for the very long delay. Enjoy this episode. Only 3 more chapters to go!~
CONTENT:
01 Introduction
02 Visual Examination
03 Plot/A Scrutiny of the Narratice
04 Characterization
05 Dialogue
06 Quote Reference
07 Closing
SONGS USED:
"Alone" and "For Real" for music while reviewing
"Everybody's changing" by Keane between breaks and for Intro/Closing
*audio clip courtesy of Watchmen Motion Comics


click me and listen to it here!


  • The chapter runs 35:45 including instrumental tracks. Introduction starts with me expressing my gratitude that I was still able to review the graphic novel even with a hell schedule. I also explained that I plan to continue reviewing other comic books and perhaps branch-out to novels as well, perhaps A Song of Ice and Fire. I also shared my views on the upcoming Before Watchmen comics and that I will be reviewing them as well (yay!)

  • Panel sequences in this chapter have the same technique used by the fourth and sixth chapters as discussed in the Visual Examination. Gibbons also uses a central metaphor to complement its thematic storyline. Scenes are spliced in order to narrate past and present events cohesively. It works quite fantastically.

  • Plot / A Scrutiny of the Narrative is Laurie-centered. It focuses strongly on her memories with a few revelations about other characters here and there. While the reminiscing is going on, the present focus on Dr. Manhattan's scientific philosophizing provides a great contrast to Laurie's sentimentality.

  • Incredible dynamics between Laurie and Dr. Manhattan in Characterization. There is so much tension between them and yet despite their age gap and intellectual differences, it actually makes sense to me as a reader that they were once romantically entangled.

  • The Dialogue aspect makes me laugh. It reads a little preachy and yet it does stimulate readers' logic and comprehension.

  • Quote Reference is intensely humane. This is a very uplifting chapter that is as touching as the seventh chapter. Alan Moore's literary grasp keeps evolving before the readers' eyes. He just knows how to balance the light and dark sides of Watchmen. He defintely knows how to keep pulling in the readers further into the stories of these characters they are already emotionally invested in.

  • Personal song choice once more. Keane's song about growth, change, letting go and personal redemption just fits Laurie's discovery about her paternity and Dr. Manhattan's grand epiphany about the miracles in humanity.

I cannot stress how much the ending prose made me teary-eyed. What makes Watchmen truly one of the greatest literature ever written is in the strength of Moore's creative understanding about human nature. This chapter gives readers hope and it's a hope that dangles on a string.
 
 
Current Mood: artistic
 
 
29 January 2012 @ 06:10 pm
Happy New Year!~
I will be taking a hiatus. My next chapter review will be on the second week of March

CONTENT:
01 Introduction
02 Visual Examination
03 Plot and Narrative
04 Characterization
05 Dialogue
06 Quote Reference
07 Fan Reaction
08 Closing

SONGS USED:
"L's Theme A" for Introduction
"L's Theme B" for music while reviewing
"Let it die" by Foo Fighters between breaks and for Closing

click me and listen to it here!


  • The chapter runs 36:16 including instrumental tracks. I'm all sneezy and shit while recording this. My Introduction pretty much says that. I also announced my hiatus. Hard to breathe and talk but I managed to pull through anyway :p I'm awesome that way.

  • Long-angled shots for the panel sequences in this chapter as discussed in Visual Examination. Gibbons is doing a variation with his grid layout. Some splicing is also ever-present, combining scenes happening simultaneously. It has a movie-feel to them. Everything has a dynamic vibe.

  • Plot pacing and development is more brisk with the action and suspense. Like in film, it's cut-to-cut scenes in every page. The effect is something to be desired. Readers pick up the pacing easily but are still able to enjoy the twists and turns as well.

  • Nothing new in regards to Characterization, except for the appearance of retired heroes Hollis and Sally reminiscing; as well as that tiny insight on Nite Owl's partnership with Rorschach in the old days. Everything is a nostalgic visit in this chapter. And the fact that Walter Kovacs is a badass.

  • Nothing so memorable about the Dialogue aspect, except the tragic prose Tales of the Black Freighter always convey. They're particularly jarring in this chapter.

  • Quote Reference on Halloween, thematic and it bleeds in the final pages so heartbreakingly. I'm sneezy and a little teary-eyed at the same time.

  • Personal song choice once more. Foo says it all.

The imagery for this chapter overall is chilling. The action has escalated and the plot has evolved into something more sinister than I originally anticipated. You have learned to care so much about these characters, even the sideline ones. Everyone is caught up with things they're running away from and things they are forced to face. Moore's storytelling here has a gripping quality that made me want to read the next chapter immediately. Too bad for hiatus. Need to take care of my health now.
 
 
Current Mood: cheerfulcheerful
 
 
 
Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!!
Dedicated to watchdom

CONTENT:
01 Introduction
02 Visual Examination
03 Plot and Narrative
04 Characterization
05 Dialogue
06 Quote Reference
07 Fan Reaction
08 Closing

SONGS USED:
"Fukisusabu Kaze no Naka de" for Introduction
"HT" and "Ningyo Hime" for music while reviewing
"Rebirthing" by Skillet between breaks and for Closing



CLICK ME AND LISTEN TO IT HERE!




  • This chapter runs 32:02 including instrumental tracks. It's hardly festive but the mood is just right. I considered this a nice break from the mindfuck and the morbidity of the previous chapters.

  • The Visual Examination was an easy-breezy one. There aren't a lot of layers in this chapter and it was surprisingly humane and relatable. Gibbons maintained the nine-grid panel layout but made use of expanding ones in a few pages. I also like the change from dull to vibrant colors as the scenes escalated. The prevailing metaphor is intact.

  • I combined Plot and Narrative because this chapter is sort of a personal one while still a part of the major plot. The story revolved around Dan and Laurie's flaws and magnificence as people who eventually form a deeper bond. Moore knows the right temperature for romance. Nothing cheesy about the interactions at all. The prose is humanistic and meaningful.

  • Oh, I think Dan and Laurie may not be as complex but they are very much relevant. They have problems and insecurities a great majority of readers undergo in their own lives. That's why the Characterization spoke to me. It was unexpectedly sweet in all the right places.

  • Dan and Laurie's conversations made up the Dialogue aspect. I enjoyed getting to know them as they get to know each other; especially their masked vigilante personas.

  • Quote Reference amused me to no end.

  • I shared the views fandom has for Dan and Laurie, individually and as a couple in the Fan Reaction segment, as well as my opinions for their movie counterparts.

  • I chose a pretty hard rock song but the lyrics are just so them :p

This chapter is one of my favorites. It's such an amazing feat for Moore and Gibbons to include a chapter so full of hope and optimism when Watchmen is an ugly world of moral ambiguity and potential nuclear disasters. Dan and Laurie re-define themselves in this chapter and are therefore more able to embrace who they are when they wear their costumes. In a way, being behind the mask actually unveils them as human beings. It's wonderfully bittersweet and their dynamics are a perfect fit.
 
 
Current Mood: cheerfulcheerful
 
 


Dedicated to meioneys

CONTENT:
01 Introduction
02 Visual Examination
03 Characterization
04 A Scrutiny of the Narrative
05 Quote Reference
06 Fan Reaction
07 Closing

SONGS USED:
"Ningyo Hime" for Introduction & Fan Reaction
"Jigoku Nagashi" and "Ake ni Somaru" for music while reviewing
"Shackled" by Vertical Horizon between breaks & for Closing

*audio clips courtesy of Watchmen Motion Comics


  • This chapter review runs 37:15 including instrumental tracks. Just like in the fourth chapter, this one is a personal look at the character of Rorschach. The standard format is indicated above.

  • I abused the Motion Comics audio clips :p

  • There was nothing special about the visual look of this chapter, except that it feels claustrophobic. There is darkness in the panels that are contrasted by brightly-lit oranges, reds and yellows. Gibbons and Higgins' choice of color palette in this chapter is certainly interesting.

  • I've always had a degree of dislike for Rorschach which developed into a fondness at this point. In this segment, I discussed the difference between Walter Kovacs and Rorschach, as well as what they represented. I also deconstructed his psyche while examining the psychiatrist Malcolm Long and his role in understanding Rorschach both as a concept and as a vigilante. I also contrasted Rorschach with Dr. Manhattan. There are fascinating differences.

  • The narrative has overwhelmed me with its power and strength. While Dr. Manhattan's chapter made me sad, Rorschach's stirred dormant righteous anger that I believe is in all of us. His perception of the world might be morbid but it was real and it pulls you in because we all are born in darkness and this seems to attract us to his character (and what he stands for) even more.

  • Yes, everyone loves Rorschach, right, fandom?

  • I chose the perfect song for Rorschach, I think.

This is the most depressing chapter so far. The painful thing is Rorschach's distorted perception of how the world works actually makes sense. And that's what hurts us.
 
 
Current Mood: cheerfulcheerful
 
 
26 November 2011 @ 05:34 pm


CONTENT:
01 Introduction
02 Visual Examination
03 Plot Pacing and Development
04 Characterization
05 Dialogue
06 Quote Reference
07 Closing

SONGS USED:
"Wonders of the World" for Introduction
"Mist" for music while reviewing
"Paradise Circus" by Massive Attack between breaks and for Closing


*audio clip courtesy of Watchmen Motion Comics


  • The chapter review runs 40:34 including instrumental tracks.

  • Introduction disclosed some personal information. My updates have been quite slow lately due to RL demands. I'm struggling but I will finish Watchmen.

  • This chapter provided me with a very wide scope for Visual Examination. Everything from the previous three chapters appeared here and it's the most excruciating experience for me as I read through but it was also wonderfully masochistic. Gibbons proved his incredible grasp for this story knows no limits. Writer and artist have become one.

  • And of course, I found Plot Pacing and Development to be tedious and insufferable but I maintained humor and ended up enjoying it anyway. Moore is painstakingly diverse with his storylines and the suspense he creates makes me shiver.

  • With the exception of doc, everyone is here. The two contrasting POVs with the TBF narratives make this chapter officially a mindfuck. I've noticed very disturbing elements at this point. Characterization alongside their scenes and settings are almost symmetrical with it and that screws with my head so much.

  • I had no idea that the language in the Dialogue aspect can consume you. Every spoken phrase has layers and they're complimented by Gibbon's visual mileage.

  • And the Quote Reference had a vice grip because William Blake's infamous poem resonates and echoes through your mind. Recite the lines yourself.

  • My personal song choice hopefully escalates the horror and beauty of this chapter.

It's simply a looking-glass chapter. There is a near-perfect symmetry in the panels. If you have a copy of the GN yourself, browse through this chapter and examine the panels. Go ahead. Some scenes are either in pairs or are parallel to each other. Everything is deliberate. Its execution is immaculate. This chapter certainly lives up to its title. Moore and Gibbons must be proud. Thanks for the mindfuck, guys.
 
 
04 November 2011 @ 05:51 pm



Dedicated to euchryz_19. Special mention: findmyantidrug


CONTENT:
01 Quote from Watchmen Motion Comics
02 Introduction
03 Visual Examination
04 Characterization
05 A Scrutiny of the Narrative
06 Quote Reference
07 Fan Reaction to Dr. Manhattan
08 Closing
SONGS USED:
"Light's Theme" for Opening and while reviewing
"Time Lapse Lifeline" by Maria Taylor between breaks and for Closing
*audio clip courtesy of Watchmen Motion Comics

  • The chapter review runs 40:42 including instrumental tracks. This one has a different standard format because it's a personal chapter focused with a single character.

  • An audio clip from the Motion Comics to take listeners deeper into the review.

  • Introduction plus disclaimer. I feel very passionately about doing this review right.

  • I think it's still appropriate to do a Visual Examination. I focused more on the symbols used as oppose to mere color schemes and sequencing. I took note of the timeline shown and how Dr. Manhattan experiences all points of time simultaneously.

  • Jon Osterman in-focus in Characterization especially his transformation into Dr. Manhattan. I discussed his eventual detachment from his humanity. I also included Moore's notes from the Absolute Watchmen edition in regards with Dr. Manhattan's conception.

  • This segment A Scrutiny of the Narrative was more about the writing itself. I described the mastery of symbolic language Moore made use of.

  • Albert Einstein as a Quote Reference and my, what an insight it is!

  • Brief discussion on Fan Reaction; what the fandom thinks about the Doc.

  • I ended with another personal song choice.

This was a spell-binding chapter that changed the way I see and appreciate things. Dr. Manhattan's disconnection pierces through and the level of complexity was even heightened through Moore's prose and Gibbon's precise symbols about time and brevity. There are so many quotable statements in this chapter. I am impressed with the way Moore understands Jon Osterman's character and was therefore able to make readers sympathize with him while being captivated by the sheer delicacy of this chapter.
 
 

CONTENT:
01 Introduction
02 Feedback
03 Visual Examination
04 Plot Placing and Development
05 Characterization
06 Dialogue
07 Quote Reference
08 Closing


SONGS USED:
"L's Theme B" for Opening, Intro remarks and breaks
"L's Theme A" while reviewing
"Illuminated" by Hurts for Closing



itunes pic


  • This chapter review runs 49:24 including instrumental tracks.

  • Introduction is shortened which included opening remarks. I announced myself in :p

  • I included a segment for feedback because of two fanmails I received (but it won't be constant, I believe). I read and answered them in this segment. Thank you for the insights and suggestions, dearest listeners. Keep those fanmail coming.

  • We carry on with Visual Examination and here I discussed the "splicing" method employed by Gibbons in the panel layout and sequencing of events. This is also where Tales of the Black Freighter comes in and it added more weight to the visual impact of the story.

  • Same splicing can also be seen in the way Moore wrote the prose of this chapter as noticeable in the Plot Pacing and Development portion. Lots of panels overlap, particularly ones that include the TBF narratives. The POV isn't Rorschach anymore and it's quite a refreshing take because Moore has expanded the scope of perspectives, introducing sideline characters that will compose the ensemble as the story evolves.

  • There is a trinity involved (or a possible love triangle?) among Dr. Manhattan, Dan and Laurie as I've mentioned in the Characterization aspect. The chapter seemed to focus on their relationships and interactions. I appreciate the sideline characters as well. Moore did a fantastic job with them.

  • Dialogue sounded very sophisticated here. Lots of jargon but it doesn't compromise the integrity of the prose itself. There's more breadth at this point.

  • A Bible quote for a Quote Reference and boy did I have fun interpreting this one!

  • No song lyrics this time so I selected a song that captures the mood of this chapter.

This is a vexing chapter that hurt my eyes and made me glance back a few pages to comprehend the next. I was challenged and that's a good thing because it means Moore and Gibbon have stepped up their game (and shit's about to get real). I had to commend Moore for his POV character. He was more relatable than Rorschach. But I might miss the paranoid SOB so I hope to read him again soon.
 
 
Current Mood: cheerfulcheerful
 
 
 


CONTENT:
01 Introduction
02 Visual Examination/Plot Placing and Development
03 Characterization/Dialogue
04 Quote Reference
05 Closing

SONGS USED:
"Strangers" for Opening for Intro remarks
"The Force of Gravity" for breaks
"Prologue" while reviewing
"The Comedians" by Elvis Costello and Roy Orbison for Closing
*audio clips courtesy of Watchmen Motion Comics


  • This chapter review runs 57:11 including instrumental tracks. I enjoyed myself way too much with this one since I considered this chapter to be an instant favorite.

  • I started to combine segments at this point because I noticed symmetrical proportions between the visual element and plot of this chapter. While I'm reviewing the visual look, I'm also jumping through the plot at the same time. I'm not sure why; but it turned out coherent, not to worry. I think this is where the podcast got extended because I discussed every scene and my interpretations in great length. Quite exhaustive and will possibly induce an earache. I apologize in advance.

  • Once again, I combined two segments and it still made sense. Characters have evolved very briskly by this chapter and their dialogue exchanges are so layered. I really enjoyed the development among these so-called superheroes and how their insecurities and motivations are gradually being unveiled but they still remain concealed. It's both irritating and exhilarating to read.

  • What a beautiful choice of song. The poignancy does not escape me. It wraps up the chapter perfectly. I chose two versions of the song to play.

The chapter is so impressive that it can stand alone by itself. The prose is filled with metaphors that are so aligned with each other it's almost diabolically enchanting. Every aspect--from the visuals and narratives to the dialogue and characters--are executed with such precise ingenuity that any reader who isn't intrigued by or in love with the graphic novel itself at this point must be dead inside. Moore knows how to balance intellectual stimulation and emotional responses. Gibbons and Higgins bring these qualities out through an artwork so brutally enlightening in the canvas. I love everything about this chapter indeed.
 
 
Current Mood: chipperchipper
 
 


CONTENT:
01 Introduction
02 Visual Examination
03 Plot Placing and Development
04 Characterization
05 Dialogue
06 Quote Reference
07 Closing

SONGS USED:
"Strangers" for Opening
"Wonders of the World" for Intro remarks
"The Force of Gravity" for breaks
"Prologue" while reviewing
"Desolation Row" by Bob Dylan for Closing

*audio clips used are courtesy of Watchmen Motion Comics


DOWNLOAD HERE

  • This chapter review runs 30:37 including instrumental tracks.

  • In the Introduction segment, I discussed how I divided the review into five categories as named above, as well as my general first impressions in browsing through the graphic novel.

  • I talked needlessly about the color schemes, panel layout and symbols by Visual Examination. This is actually a discussion on the technical aspects of the GN as employed by Dave Gibbons and his colorist Mike Higgins. There will be more of this in the next chapters because Watchmen has a very peculiar art style and I enjoy exploring that.

  • Plot cannot be taken for granted, obviously, and pacing and development are a critical stage in the first chapter. It determines how it will hook the reader and sustain that interest.

  • My favorite category, of course, is the Characterization. Moore knows how to write his characters well and Watchmen is composed of archetypes that represent moral philosophies, from what I understand since this is a deconstruction story.

  • Ah, what I love about Moore prose is the layered Dialogue he employs. So I consider this a noteworthy feature as well.

  • I personally like it when series apply song lyrics to deliver a meaningful message and Moore definitely makes most of that in his ending phrases for the Quote Reference.

  • I would include audio clips from the Motion Comics especially on important dialogue.

I'm still testing the ropes for this podcast. I make sure that while doing a recording, I have a draft script ready for each category so the podcast will be both rehearsed and spontaneous. I credit music appropriately, and most of the instrumental tracks are anime-sponsored :p I don't have an RSS for podcast yet because I haven't downloaded I-Tunes (and not really sure how to use it for now). Also, most free hosting sites are limited in MB downloads so for now, the mp3 files are linked to the podomatic site where I primarily uploaded the podcast reviews. It has a limit of 500 MB, however, so I may have to find a new way to utilize more space.
 
 
Current Mood: happyhappy
 
 
02 October 2011 @ 05:11 pm
In a short span of time since last summer of 2010, Watchmen has dominated nearly every aspect of my waking life and I want to share this to people who are just as devoted as I am. Here I will talk about the basics of what the next segments are going to be like. Watch out for updates and thank you very much for listening <3

 
 
Current Mood: happyhappy